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Broke Fordwich – Winemaking the Local Way in the Hunter Valley, Australia

  • Francesca Baker
  • 31 March 2014

In the Hunter Valley of Australia, Broke Fordwich is where the winemaking community has a local and natural feel, but the wine is no less delicious because of it. Here there is respect and responsibility for working within the limitations of the surroundings abundance, and the knowledge of the effect that it will have upon a finished product, is striking.

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Alto Hotel – Carbon-Neutral in Melbourne, Australia

  • Francesca Baker
  • 7 January 2014

Melbourne is one of the greenest cities in the world. Well on target to carbon neutrality by 2020, it has won numerous accolades. Green walls surround buildings, recycling bins are everywhere, and trams and city bikes are normal ways to commute. Located in the very heart of the city, is Alto Hotel, the region’s first carbon-neutral hotel.

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A Perfect Day in Sydney: Travelling Like a Local

  • Ethan Gelber with Jane Higgins
  • 20 March 2013

This is an homage to a home away from home in the land Down Under. By authors no longer resident there, it is a fond remembrance of Sydney – a perfect day in Sydney – informed by beloved qualities of it discovered over time.

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The Best Local Travel Pictures of 2012

  • Ethan Gelber
  • 4 January 2013

With another year of pictures under our belt, it’s time again to spotlight our Photo of the Year – an image that most captured the imagination of The Travel Word team and a group of external judges. Like our Photo of the Year 2010 and Photo of the Year 2011, we believe this year’s winning image truly captures the imagination, a glimpse of something uncommon in a very familiar place.

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Photo of the Week: Angel Place Birdcages, Sydney, Australia

  • Ryan Zaknich (photo and text)
  • 7 December 2012

This photo was taken in Angel Place in the downtown area of Sydney, Australia. It is part of an art exhibit installed by the local council to remind us of the abundant birdlife that was in the area prior to English settlement. The birdcages are empty to remind us of the birds that have long since flow away.

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Video Spotlight: Rock Art with Aboriginal Elder Willie Gordon

  • Jakub Riziky
  • 10 August 2012

Head out in the open to tropical North Queensland in Australia, where Willie Gordon, an Aboriginal elder of the Guugu Yimithirr people, offers fascinating insight into the ancient culture of his ancestors. See how indigenous tourism can help local communities to preserve their culture and get a glimpse of what you might experience if you set out discover Aboriginal Australia.

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Aboriginal Tourism in Australia: 2012

  • Karolyn Wrightson
  • 8 August 2012

Environmentalists say Australia’s Great Barrier Reef was saved from destruction because tourists saw its value and lobbied for protection. No such worldwide lobby exists for the worlds oldest surviving culture. Like the reef, though, one of the best opportunities for the survival of ancient Australian Aboriginal lore is for tourists to call for its preservation. For that to happen, Aboriginal groups must teach tourists about their culture, an act that not only helps the outside world learn, but helps them pass the traditions down to their own children.

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Photo of the Week: Colourful Council House, Perth, Australia

  • Ryan Mossny (Photo and Text)
  • 20 May 2012

This colourful display on one of Perth’s most recognisable buildings now takes place from sunset till dawn every day of the year. The magical lighting effects help to bring the building alive at night, encouraging reactivation of the city centre and drawing increased numbers of visitors back into the city in the evening.

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To Climb or Not to Climb Uluru in Australia

  • Marcela Torres
  • 16 March 2012

The Aboriginal sacred site of Uluru – also known as Ayers Rock – is one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. The time seems right to ponder over a question that has for decades been the subject of a much-heated debate: Should tourists be allowed to climb the rock or not? Respecting indigenous cultures and local traditions is at the core of the responsible tourism concept and it is the center of the controversy over Uluru.

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Trans-Oceanic Slow Travel: Booking Aboard Cargo Ships

  • Anna Rice
  • 6 March 2012

In July of last year, my boyfriend and I set out on a slow travel adventure around the world. We had one rule – no flying. Overland, we had many options – walking, cycling, riding buses, taking a train – but what about crossing the oceans? Many people are simply not aware that numerous cargo ships offer passenger cabins.

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