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Local Transport Around the World: Three-Wheeled Wonders

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+ GO TO THE LOCAL TRANSPORT MAIN PAGE
+ GO TO THE NEXT ‘LOCAL TRANSPORT’ SECTION: TRAINS ON THE RIGHT TRACK

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Trike in Boracay, Philippines

Trike in Boracay, Philippines

Trikes in Boracay, Philippines

“In the Philippines, this mode of transit is called a tricycle or, more commonly, a trike. It comes in all shapes and sizes, with the ones in Boracay being on the larger size. Normally they pack an incredible number of people in; Boracay trikes regularly carry 6-10 adults, including three up front, four in the back and one or two on the back seat of the bike with the driver. At other times, they’re used to transport double beds, sofas, huge long bundles of bamboo, etc. It’s quite a sight. In keeping with the Jeepney tradition of the Philippines, trikes are also brightly painted and colourful, usually with Catholic religious references or superheroes (same thing, I guess).”

~ Helen Atanacio, the whl.travel, Urban Adventures and Green Path Transfers local connection in Boracay, Philippines

Tirtera in Syria

Tirtera in Syria

Tirteras in Syria

In Syria, a terizena in Aleppine dialect (or a tirtera in Damascene dialect) is a roofed metal cart with a small engine of very low horsepower fuelled by the butane gas that is usually used for ovens. Newer ones are painted with elaborate polychromatic designs and beautiful decorations similar to the scania buses, while old ones are less-glamorous heaps of rusting metal. This is the transportation of choice for the masses in Syria. It is called a ‘tirtera’ because it makes a churning ‘tir tir tir’ sound.

~ Read more in Local Travel in Syria by Donkey, Tirtera and Scania Bus

Auto-remorques in Cambodia

Auto-remorques in Cambodia

Auto-remorques in Cambodia

In Cambodia, auto-rickshaws are called auto-remorques, a motorcycle-meets-carriage mishmash. If you’re keen, the bizarre and absurdist Cambo Challenge adventure trip is a way for you to try your hand at driving one on.

~ Read more in Top Five Rickshaws YOU Can Drive

Tuk-tuks in Thailand

Tuk-tuk in Thailand

Tuk-Tuks in Thailand

Tuk-tuks in Bangkok are some of the most expensive in Thailand. This ‘luxury’ tuk-tuk pictured above shuttles its classy clients to and from an upscale condominium complex.

For foreigners, tuk-tuks can turn out to be even more expensive than vehicle taxis if you don’t know the going price and stand your ground dnirug negotiations. Tuk-tuk drivers in Bangkok will try to charge fresh tourists 200 Thai baht (about US$6.50) for a distance they would quote 40 baht (US$1.50) to a Thai local.

~ Read more in Tuk-Tuk Truths from Bangkok, Thailand

Becak in Makassar, Indonesia

Becak in Makassar, Indonesia

Becaks in Indonesia

Becaks are one of the forms of public transport in Makassar, Indonesia, although no one knows when the becak first arrived. Becaks in Makassar are slightly smaller and shorter than those in Java. This makes the Makassar becak much more efficient and convenient for its passengers.”

~ Ng Sebastian, the whl.travel local connection in Makassar, Indonesia

Cyclos in Vietnam

Cyclos in Vietnam

Cyclos in Vietnam

“I am a regular visitor to Vietnam and have used cyclos in all the major cities. I love them… quiet havens in the midst of a very frantic world of motorcycles. When seeing how the passenger sits up front looking like a battering ram, first impressions are that it must be very unsafe. The reality is quite the opposite, as bikes and cars give cyclos a wide berth, presumably realising that cyclos are anything but nimble and take a while to stop and to manoeuvre. Once out of the rush of traffic, the ride is peaceful and relaxed, allowing you to take in things you would miss using any form of motorised transport. Walking is the only way to see more, but frankly, as much of Vietnam is not very pedestrian friendly (sidewalks, where they exist, are mostly for commerce), cyclos get my vote for the best way to get around.”

~ Len Cordiner, CEO of the WHL Group

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+ GO TO THE LOCAL TRANSPORT MAIN PAGE
+ GO TO THE NEXT ‘LOCAL TRANSPORT’ SECTION: TRAINS ON THE RIGHT TRACK

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