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Posts Tagged ‘history’

Explore Jerusalem Like a Local

  • Roy K.
  • 18 July 2012

Jerusalem is the kind of historic city with so many landmarks that it is easy to have your itinerary written for you before you even set foot within the city limits. To truly bring the contemporary city of Jerusalem to life, however, it helps to dig a little deeper and uncover some local gems. Jerusalem is much more than just a history museum and the crossroads of religion. It is also a modern metropolis.

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Photo of the Week: Caxadaço Beach, Ilha Grande, Brazil

  • Nélio Ricardo Aguiar (Photo and Text)
  • 3 June 2012

Caxadaço Beach sits prettily on the south coast of Ilha Grande, Brazil, gently curving around the tranquil and clear waters of a beautiful natural harbour. The bay itself is masked from the sea by the large rocky outcrop, seen in the photo below, and the landward side soon gives way to thick jungle vegetation.

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Photo of the Week: The View From Mount Sinai, Dahab, Egypt

  • Eric Monkaba (Photo) Gunyah (Text)
  • 6 May 2012

Standing on top of Mt. Sinai, a trekking guide looks over the St. Katherine’s Protectorate, situated about a two hours’ drive from Dahab, Egypt. He is a member of the Jabaelya tribe, one of the seven tribes of the South Sinai region. This unique tribe is a mixture of Arab and Eastern European blood, descending from the soldiers of Emperor Justinian, who he brought to guard the Monastery of St. Katherine.

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Video Spotlight: A Story for Tomorrow

  • Paul Tavner
  • 4 March 2012

The voiceover for this video lends a fairytale quality to the piece. It makes us think of journeys that we’ve undertaken in the past with fondness, but it also inspires the familiar feeling of wanderlust. The thrill of adventure and imagining having our own narrator to catalogue our travels are both appealing prospects.

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Three Captivating Stories About Ukraine

  • Oksana Arkhypchuk
  • 30 January 2012

Situated in the east of Europe, Ukraine remains a mystical and misunderstood land. A simple west-to-east cross of this country and you are bound to get the most intriguing history lesson. Along the way, you will discover that there are plenty of cultural myths and stories, the kinds about unique local archetypal characters that will capture your imagination and keep you coming back for more local travel experiences in Ukraine.

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Photo of the Week: Doors to the Past, Ouro Preto, Brazil

  • Wallace Faria (Photo)
  • 15 January 2012

This shot captures two of the most distinguishing features of the former mining town of Ouro Preto, Brazil; specifically, its pronounced sense of heritage and its elements of outstanding baroque architecture. This doorway almost feels like a portal into the past, with its chipped facade, rusted lintel and worn steps all contributing to a feeling of tremendous age and quiet dignity.

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Photo of the Week: Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

  • Cindy Fan (Photo and Text)
  • 11 December 2011

With the UN-backed trial of three senior surviving Khmer Rouge leaders finally underway in Phnom Penh, the world is reminded of Cambodia’s sad history. One memorial of its darkest times is S-21, a school-turned-detention centre (and now a genocide museum), where, after the Khmer Rouge fled, a startling photonegative archive were discovered. Today, hundreds of stark black-and-white portraits line the museum walls. It is a moving, eye-opening display.

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Myths and Minarets in Uzbekistan’s Ancient Cities of Khiva, Bukhara and Samarkand

  • Cynthia Ord
  • 28 November 2011

Uzbekistan is a premier cultural heritage destination sought out each year by more and more travellers wishing to immerse themselves in the magic of Central Asia’s Great Silk Road. How do you keep your bearings? Learn the unique stories behind the buildings. In each of Uzbekistan’s three Silk Road cities – Bukhara, Khiva and Samarkand – a landmark minaret has a myth behind it, adding a touch of intrigue to the present-day wonder.

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Photo of the Week: Tshechu Dancers, Bhutan

  • Dawa Choden (Photo)
  • 27 November 2011

The whirling silks of this Tshechu dancer’s costume blossom into an impressive shape as he loses himself in the rhythm of the traditional Cham (or Tscham) dance as part of the Lhuntse Tshechu, an annual festival held in northeastern Bhutan. These masked dancers perform to a musical accompaniment provided by brother monks or other locals.

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Photo of the Week: Gur-e Amir Mausoleum – the Tomb of Temur, Samarkand, Uzbekistan

  • Luke Ford (Photo) Cynthia Ord (Text)
  • 13 November 2011

In a place called Shakhrisabz, about 80 kilometres south of Samarkand in Uzbekistan, a giant monument to the 14th-century Mongol khan Temor (Tamerlane) marks the place he was born. The towering statue of Temor cues what is to come: in the city of Samarkand itself, even more references to one of the country’s most important historical figures are to be found, including the heavily-restored mausoleum where he was buried.

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