Quantcast

Posts Tagged ‘trekking’

Community-Based Tourism in Northern Nicaragua

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 15 July 2013

These days, people living in the northern highlands of Nicaragua enjoy a far more tranquil existence than the war-torn 1980s. These peaceful times have helped in the welcome growth of a variety of successful community-based tourism projects. These local responsible travel initiatives are improving the livelihoods of local mountain residents.

Read More >>

Homestays: Experiencing the Real Laos

  • Cindy Fan
  • 16 July 2012

We’re in the small village of Ban Dong Muong in southern Laos. We’ll be staying in someone’s home tonight – no hotels here. Our accommodations will be the floor of a simple home. Village life is an integral part of Lao culture and society, and this homestay will allow us to experience how the majority of people in this developing country live.

Read More >>

Chadar Trek: Walking on a Frozen River in Ladakh, India

  • Divij Pasrija
  • 4 June 2012

With my rucksack lightly packed, I travelled from summery Delhi to the small town of Leh and the start of my trekking adventure in Ladakh in snowy northern India. I had come to Leh to hike one particular route, called the Chadar Trek, along the frozen Zanskar River, one major reason why tourists visit Ladakh in the winter (mid-January to the end of February).

Read More >>

Photo of the Week: The View From Mount Sinai, Dahab, Egypt

  • Eric Monkaba (Photo) Gunyah (Text)
  • 6 May 2012

Standing on top of Mt. Sinai, a trekking guide looks over the St. Katherine’s Protectorate, situated about a two hours’ drive from Dahab, Egypt. He is a member of the Jabaelya tribe, one of the seven tribes of the South Sinai region. This unique tribe is a mixture of Arab and Eastern European blood, descending from the soldiers of Emperor Justinian, who he brought to guard the Monastery of St. Katherine.

Read More >>

Ecotourism in Ghana: Undiscovered Kyabobo

  • Leif Ryman
  • 30 April 2012

Kyabobo is Ghana’s newest national park. For the host communities, the ecotourism that has come with it means “improved livelihood activities” or jobs as guides, cooks and craftspeople. The income generated is used for local development projects, like bringing electricity to nearby communities and providing materials for the construction of schools and toilets.

Read More >>

Taking the High Road: Mountain Treks for All

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 17 April 2012

For centuries, high-minded travellers, wise men and ladies alike, have sought out the world’s mountains, revelling in the challenge of the climb and capturing in photographs and ink the terrific views and exaltation that come at the end of long and strenuous hikes. Ridge-rambling adventurers are, if anything, more numerous today than ever before. Fortunately, mountain treks abound, gauged to hikers of all abilities.

Read More >>

Video Spotlight: The Longest Way

  • Paul Tavner
  • 15 April 2012

Often, personal grooming is one the first victims of a long spell of travelling. It’s fair to say that a lot of us tend to take a more ‘pragmatic’ approach when we’re out on the road. After all, that’s what makes proper showers such a prized commodity. This means that sometimes we can all end up looking a bit scruffy. That’s fine, since everyone’s in the same boat and no one’s going to judge you when you flop into your hostel bed at the end of a long day of trekking.

Read More >>

Trekking to Northern Thailand’s Mountain-top Villages

  • Gina Douglas
  • 9 April 2012

I look around at the motorcycles, the well-dressed children and the minimalist huts and find myself wondering if it’s all an act. Do they head back down the mountain after we’re all asleep? Is this just a well-produced illusion for tourists? Then I notice a woman hanging up laundry and I pass what looks like a bare-bones general store. This definitely is a lived-in – and by all appearances happy – village.

Read More >>

Worth the Journey! Tayrona National Park, Colombia

  • Heather Rath
  • 4 April 2012

Today, Tayrona proudly displays its true nature as a safe environment for tourists. Since its elevation in status to a national park in 1969, this biodiversity area covering 12,000 hectares of land and 3,000 of sea has been growing in popularity. Within its territory are sandy beaches, dazzling blue/azure ocean waters, tropical dry jungle and a rainforest up to 900 metres in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

Read More >>

Slow Down for a Local Travel Experience of Cape Town, South Africa

  • Mark Stodel
  • 17 February 2012

Here’s the best piece of advice you can get from a local: if you really want to get under the skin of Cape Town, you have to slow things down. If you speed through the city, you will miss out on the great subtleties that give Cape Town its character. It’ll melt together and become a blur, as if you are driving a car at 100 miles per hour and trying to look out the window.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger... Read More >>