Quantcast

Browsing Oceania Articles

Trans-Oceanic Slow Travel: Booking Aboard Cargo Ships

  • Anna Rice
  • 6 March 2012

In July of last year, my boyfriend and I set out on a slow travel adventure around the world. We had one rule – no flying. Overland, we had many options – walking, cycling, riding buses, taking a train – but what about crossing the oceans? Many people are simply not aware that numerous cargo ships offer passenger cabins.

Read More >>

Rediscovering Home in the Suburbs of Sydney, Australia

  • Len Cordiner
  • 29 February 2012

My wife and I started our own ‘slow travel’ mission. For the past four months, we have been checking out the natural world in and around Sydney – starting in our own backyard. We were amazed – thrilled, even – at what we found. In the large tracts of mangrove forest and bushland, we couldn’t see any hint of suburbia. Instead, we encountered many different species of plants and wildflowers.

Read More >>

Rennell Island World Heritage Site Tours Find Equilibrium in the Solomon Islands

  • WHL Group
  • 7 December 2011

Deep in the South Pacific, in the Solomon Islands, is an atoll called Rennell Island. Like so many other natural World Heritage Sites that have gained UNESCO recognition for their unique biogeography, Rennell faces a dilemma: It wants to realise its high potential for ecotourism, but this can only happen if the infrastructure remains basic and little or no development is imposed on the area’s natural and cultural attractions. Can this precarious balance be achieved?

Read More >>

Photo of the Week: The Children of Yakel Village, Tanna, Vanuatu

  • John Nicholls (Photo and Text)
  • 7 August 2011

Living what some outsiders would consider a feral existence is normal to the children of Yakel, a ‘Kastom’ village on the island of Tanna in the Vanuatu archipelago. The settlement is referred to locally as a Nambas village – the Nambas being the sole item of apparel worn by men, hiding their private parts. This means that the village rejects everything introduced by the Western world. The children will never go to school. Their clothing, food and entertainment will be provided solely by the forest in which they live.

Read More >>

Maori Culture and Natural Warmth in Whakarewarewa Village, New Zealand

  • Raumati Wikaire
  • 4 August 2011

Whakarewarewa Village is a living Maori village located in the thermal region of Rotorua on the North Island of New Zealand. Its doors have been open to tourists since more than a century ago when an 1886 volcanic eruption destroyed the historic pink and white terraces at Lake Tarawera, New Zealand’s first tourist attraction. Whakarewarewa Village today is inhabited by 25 families who go about their daily lives but allow visitors to move amongst them and learn about their customs and culture.

Read More >>

Ancient Teachings in a Modern World: Willie Gordon’s Guurrbi Tours in Australia

  • Karolyn Wrightson
  • 1 August 2011

Willie Gordon is likely simply to ask a traveller on one of his Guurrbi Tours “When was the Beginning for you?” I’ve yet to hear someone able to answer him. It is quite humbling to be in the presence of someone who is still in touch with his Beginning. I’ve seen rock paintings of animals that have been extinct for thousands of years, but in far too many magnificent rock art sites, the full story has been lost. Willie, however, learned what he knows directly from elders and grandparents.

Read More >>

See Stylish Sydney the Green Way with Corporate Cars Australia

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 23 June 2011

Finding a reliable transportation service in Sydney, Australia, is essential for discovering the many local gems, and one Sydney taxi company, now the Green Path Transfers local partner, has the experience, the expertise and, especially important, the green underpinnings to help all visitors make the most of their stay.

Read More >>

Photo of the Week: Fish of Espiritu Santo Island, Vanuatu

  • John Nicholls (photo and text)
  • 7 May 2011

Looking at the world from a reflected perspective can produce far superior images than one’s attempt at orchestrating it. Reflections can completely alter the image from something fairly straightforward to a more artistic, whimsical abstract. I especially like using water, as the liquid medium not only reflects but absorbs light in space, often with subject matter suspended in that potential energy.

Read More >>

Who’s Who in Vanuatu: An Interview with a Local Travel Expert

  • WHL Group
  • 30 March 2011

Silvana Nicholls and her husband, John Nicholls, were some of the earliest local partners to join the whl.travel family. They launched their Vanuatu destination portal in November of 2005 and have been strong collaborators ever since. She arrived on the island of Vanuatu in the South Pacific in 2001 and spent the first three years on the volcanic island of Tanna before moving to the capital city of Port Vila on Efate Island, where she and John still live.

Read More >>

Queensland, Australia, Faces Devastating Floods

  • Shaun Gilchrist
  • 15 January 2011

In 1974, the flooding Brisbane River of Queensland, Australia, peaked at 5.4 metres. It has been etched in local memory as the worst inundation the city and surrounding areas faced in the 20th century. Although the Brisbane River peaked just below the 1974 level on 13 January 2011, the damage has been far more targic and it is now the new point of reference for flood devastation.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger... Read More >>