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Browsing indigenous culture Articles

Yunnan Ecotourism: A Short Hike to Explore the Fascinating Sights Beyond Lijiang City, China

  • Lily Zhang
  • 30 October 2012

It’s been a long time since I’ve been outside the city of Lijiang (Yunnan, China) due to my work schedule. Wenhai village, where the local people still adhere to traditional culture and lifestyle, is located northwest of Lijiang city at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain (Mount Satseto), the highest mountain in Lijiang.

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Going Local in Rajasthan, India, on a Bishnoi Village Safari

  • Divij Pasrija
  • 21 October 2012

Choosing to take a break in rural Rajasthan, four friends and I left Delhi in search of a travel experience that would be different than the usual touristy stuff. We decided on a Bishnoi Village Safari, which included an adventurous trip through the deserts surrounding Jodhpur and an intimate experience of the rural life of the Bishnois – an ancient clan from Rajasthan.

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Preserving the Tribal Custom of the Ibans, Once the Headhunters of Borneo

  • Oshin Chin
  • 14 October 2012

Ibans are the native people of Sarawak and the dominant ethnic group in Malaysian Borneo. Today, their headhunting days are long gone, but they have succeeded in preserving many tribal customs, rituals and traditional beliefs. These are clearly visible during their harvest festivals, weddings and unique art and crafts such as Pua Kumbu, the Ngajat dance and the Iban tattoos.

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May I Take a Picture of You?

  • Marcela Torres
  • 10 October 2012

Meeting people from other countries and cultures is part of the magic of traveling. We often encounter charming people that share their traditions with us and we can’t resist the temptation of capturing that moment with our photographic cameras. This enthusiastic impulse, however, may sometimes cause an unexpected negative reaction.

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Agritourism in Panama: Pick the Newest Crop

  • Yariseth Acevedo
  • 16 September 2012

While farming has deep roots in the green rural regions of Panama, agritourism is just starting to bud. TUCAYA Panama is excited to nurture the seeds of several sustainable agritourism projects and watch them grow. TUCAYA’s small tours visit a hand-picked selection of worthwhile farm hosts throughout the country.

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Photo of the Week: Boat Building the Traditional Way in Malawi

  • Kate Webb (photo and text)
  • 17 August 2012

Local fishermen on the Lake Malawi use traditional methods to build wonderful wooden fishing boats that can last for over 25 years. One boat builder, Joseph, has also engaged in community development and environmental protection.

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Authenticity, Giving Back and the Awkward Case of Indigenous Tourism

  • Daniel Kreuger
  • 15 August 2012

Travel industry trend watchers have lately observed that, with the ideas of ‘authenticity,’ ‘giving back,’ ‘participation,’ and ‘engagement’ resonating with travellers, there are new alliances developing between the adventure tourism industry and the world’s indigenous communities. I believe these consumer and industry trends are encouraging.

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Video Spotlight: Rock Art with Aboriginal Elder Willie Gordon

  • Jakub Riziky
  • 10 August 2012

Head out in the open to tropical North Queensland in Australia, where Willie Gordon, an Aboriginal elder of the Guugu Yimithirr people, offers fascinating insight into the ancient culture of his ancestors. See how indigenous tourism can help local communities to preserve their culture and get a glimpse of what you might experience if you set out discover Aboriginal Australia.

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Aboriginal Tourism in Australia: 2012

  • Karolyn Wrightson
  • 8 August 2012

Environmentalists say Australia’s Great Barrier Reef was saved from destruction because tourists saw its value and lobbied for protection. No such worldwide lobby exists for the worlds oldest surviving culture. Like the reef, though, one of the best opportunities for the survival of ancient Australian Aboriginal lore is for tourists to call for its preservation. For that to happen, Aboriginal groups must teach tourists about their culture, an act that not only helps the outside world learn, but helps them pass the traditions down to their own children.

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Oxlajuj B’atz’ Maya Women’s Center: Hands-on Cultural Tours in the Heart of Guatemala

  • Oxlajuj B'atz'
  • 6 August 2012

Oxlajuj B’atz’ (OB) – meaning “Thirteen Threads” in the Maya Kaqchikel language – is a non-profit organization in Guatemala supporting indigenous women’s empowerment and education. OB offers travelers the opportunity to tour rural Guatemala and to learn about Mayan women achieving economic independence through innovative and sustainable development projects.

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