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The Allure of Aluna, Princess of Lao Pop Music

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 11 July 2011

Lao musical artists’ devotion to their craft dates back thousands of years. In their spirit of devotion, the best musicians have experimented and created unique traditions and styles. This same persistent approach can be heard today in the mesmerising music of Aluna, the princess of pop in Laos.

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Photo of the Week: Tudo é Jazz Festival, Ouro Preto, Brazil

  • André Franchini (photo and text)
  • 10 July 2011

This year, Ouro Preto’s Festival Tudo é Jazz will pay homages to Tom Jobim, the great master of Brazilian music. In its 10th year, the festival usually brings jazz fans from all over Brazil, who gather around a few stages erected around the town.

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Seychelles: Something to Sing and Dance About

  • Pascal Esparon
  • 7 July 2011

The music of Seychelles is, and has always been, largely influenced by the instruments and the dance of the people who chose to make their homes here. So where did the Seychellois originally come from? Everywhere! This is why we call our country “the melting pot of cultures.”

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I’m with the Band: Sharing Music at Weddings in Bukhara, Uzbekistan

  • Stephen Lioy
  • 6 July 2011

My chance encounter with Sadriddin occurred in a local coffee shop in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. What started as an inquisitive chat between tables ended with an invitation to join him and a musician friend for a jam session in his living room. After three or four songs, he suggested that, later that night, I attend a local wedding reception at which he was performing.

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The Sound of the Impact on the Drum: Moldavian Music

  • Samantha Libby
  • 5 July 2011

Like most folk tunes, Moldavian music is deeply rooted in national traditions, characterised by the use of traditional musical instruments such as the ‘nai’. Nowadays, young people are getting their folk fix with the likes of internationally famous bands such as Zdob şi Zdub, a name that roughly translates as ‘the sound of impact on the drum’.

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Corfu Music: Philharmonics in the Streets of Greece

  • Eva Makris
  • 4 July 2011

With influences from Italy, France, Great Britain and mainland Greece, Corfu music is full of surprises. Walking through the narrow alleys – the ‘candounia’ – of Corfu Town, you may suddenly stumble across a spontaneous string quartet playing local traditional songs.

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Top Five Airport Flash Mobs

  • Cynthia Ord
  • 29 June 2011

Is there anything fun or pleasant about being at the airport? Well, sometimes, for some very fortunate travellers, a spontaneous display of entertainment erupts. If you see a spectacle of coordinated, performance-quality singing and dancing unfold around you in any public place, including airports and train stations, stop and appreciate the spectacle. Don’t blink, for this is something special. You are in the midst of a flash mob.

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An Interview with Yolanda Clatworthy, the Ultimate Triptrotter

  • The Travel Word
  • 28 June 2011

For five weeks, Triptrotting has searched for the ‘Ultimate Triptrotter’ to have the ‘Ultimate Triptrotting Summer Experience.’ With over 300 entries and dozens of videos, they had their hands full. On June 9, 2011, a decision was finally made and Yolanda Clatworthy, an International Relations student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, was picked as the winner. Now you get to meet her!

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Sacred in Morocco: the Fes Music Festival

  • Maureen Valentine
  • 31 May 2011

Morocco is the perfect place for a travel itinerary that takes in a musical event like no other. Every year, the World Sacred Music Festival in Fes promises a diverse range of musical acts and fills the famous Fes medina (aka Fes el-Bali). It’s a unique celebration of cultural exchange and rhythms, a gathering of musicians (in 2011, from June 3rd through June 11th) from all corners of the planet for tantalising feasts of music, culture and, of course, mouthwatering Moroccan food.

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Inti Raymi: The Sun God Festival of Cusco, Peru

  • Fernando Carrasco
  • 20 May 2011

Each year, hundreds of thousands of people – locals and foreigners alike – flock to Cusco, Peru, for Inti Raymi, one of the biggest annual festivals in South America. A solstice celebration of ancient Incan origin, it survived colonial Spain’s attempt to stifle it in the 16th century to become the grandest traditional display of Inca culture that still flourishes in living colour today.

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