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Posts Tagged ‘ancient culture’

Colombia’s Call: From a Lost City to the Amazon with Mambe Travel

  • Andrew Thompson
  • 10 November 2013

Once a place travellers were advised to avoid, Colombia no longer suffers from the ill effects of powerful drug cartels at war with one another and the government. It is now a place attracting ever larger crowds, drawn in by its world-class natural and cultural attractions. Here are just two of them, as well as the kind of community-conscious tour operator that will help you make the most of your stay.

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Explore Jerusalem Like a Local

  • Roy K.
  • 18 July 2012

Jerusalem is the kind of historic city with so many landmarks that it is easy to have your itinerary written for you before you even set foot within the city limits. To truly bring the contemporary city of Jerusalem to life, however, it helps to dig a little deeper and uncover some local gems. Jerusalem is much more than just a history museum and the crossroads of religion. It is also a modern metropolis.

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Navigating the Peloponnese of Greece with whl.travel

  • whl.travel
  • 2 March 2012

THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH AND GREEK. There’s more to tourism in the Peloponnese of Greece than just sightseeing; the funny-shaped peninsula thrusting south into the Mediterranean Sea from the country’s mainland is home to some of the greatest sites of Ancient Greece, each engaging in its own unique ways.

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Prestigious Port Said Brings the Suez Canal to the whl.travel Network in Egypt

  • whl.travel
  • 21 December 2011

WHL Egypt manages destination portals all across Egypt, including Cairo, Sharm El Sheikh, Aswan and Luxor, Safaga and Ein Sokhna. Now, with the addition of www.portsaid-shoreexcursions.com, the staff at WHL Egypt is excited to continue the partnership with whl.travel, a company with which it shares a commitment to ethical travel and the preservation of history and culture around the world.

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Seven UNESCO World Heritage All-Stars and Alternatives

  • Cynthia Ord
  • 12 December 2011

UNESCO recognition through its World Heritage List and time in the subsequent travel spotlight can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, a new site gets a big status boost and some protection. On the other hand, an influx of tourists adds pressures and more need for protection. One way to curb this effect is for travellers to visit alternative heritage destinations where high tourism congestion isn’t causing problems.

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Photo of the Week: Abu Simbel Temple, Luxor and Aswan, Egypt

  • Alfred Molon (Photo) Hossam Mostafa (Text)
  • 18 September 2011

The mighty temples in this Photo of the Week have made the name of Abu Simbel internationally famous since their rediscovery in the early 19th century. Originally constructed during the reign of Ramesses II in the mid 13th century BCE, the temples were lost in the shifting sands of the Nubian desert for many centuries.

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The Inside Word on… Xieng Khouang, Laos

  • Andreas Hofmann
  • 26 May 2011

With so many destinations in the WHL Group’s ever-expanding network, we have an incredible wealth of local travel information at our fingertips. Through the Inside Word, our local partners – all travel experts – share their top tips on what to do, what to eat, where to party and where to shop in their neck of the woods. This month, we’re in the loop with Andreas Hofmann in Xieng Khouang, Laos.

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“For the Love of My Queen”: the Temples of Abu Simbel in Southern Egypt

  • Dr Benedict G. Davies
  • 5 January 2011

Through mighty works in stone – the supreme tools of royal propaganda – Ramesses II hoped to ensure that word of his supreme authority would extend throughout the Nubian lands, striking fear into the disparate, lawless tribes that inhabited these desert territories. In all, he would construct seven rock-cut temples in Nubia, the most impressive of which were the twin temples at Abu Simbel, one of which was devoted to his favourite queen, Nefertari.

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Uncover the Ancient History of Laos’ Plain of Jars

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 6 November 2010

Situated in the high plateaus of northeast Laos, the mountainous scenery of Xieng Khouang province beckons travellers to discover one of Southeast Asia’s most mysterious ancient cultural sites: the Plain of Jars. On guided tours in the mist-shrouded hills, uncover the enigmatic history of vanished civilisations and hear tales of secret wars waged.

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