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Posts Tagged ‘archaeological site’

Colombia’s Call: From a Lost City to the Amazon with Mambe Travel

  • Andrew Thompson
  • 10 November 2013

Once a place travellers were advised to avoid, Colombia no longer suffers from the ill effects of powerful drug cartels at war with one another and the government. It is now a place attracting ever larger crowds, drawn in by its world-class natural and cultural attractions. Here are just two of them, as well as the kind of community-conscious tour operator that will help you make the most of your stay.

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Astonishing Antalya, Turkey, Brings the Turkish Riviera to whl.travel

  • whl.travel
  • 1 February 2012

THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH AND TURKISH. On Turkey’s pristine south coast, nestled between the Taurus Mountains and the Mediterranean Sea, the city of Antalya has long been a favourite holiday destination. Dubbed the new Turkish Riviera, the flanking seaboard offers everything from Roman ruins to hiking or kayaking deep canyons.

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Seven UNESCO World Heritage All-Stars and Alternatives

  • Cynthia Ord
  • 12 December 2011

UNESCO recognition through its World Heritage List and time in the subsequent travel spotlight can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, a new site gets a big status boost and some protection. On the other hand, an influx of tourists adds pressures and more need for protection. One way to curb this effect is for travellers to visit alternative heritage destinations where high tourism congestion isn’t causing problems.

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Will It Be End Times in 2012? Ask the Mayans in Guatemala

  • Cynthia Ord
  • 21 November 2011

December 21, 2012, is the last day of the 13th baktun of the Mayan calendar, a day on which many believe that something big is going to happen. Rather than preparing for the apocalypse, why not plan a 2012 tour of the Mayan pyramids and prophesies in Guatemala? Explore the grand ruins of ancient Mayan civilisations. Meet a traditional living Mayan community of today and find out firsthand what they are thinking and doing as you take part in sacred rituals and ceremonies.

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Malta’s Tentative UNESCO Sites: See Them Before It’s Official

  • whl.travel
  • 9 November 2011

While UNESCO approval of seven proposed World Heritage sites in Malta is still pending, their worth is certainly not negated by bureaucratic delays. In fact, their absence from the official list means that they have been kept just outside the UNESCO spotlight and perhaps a little farther off the tourist trail than the three recognised attractions. Here are the additional sites that Malta thinks deserve an equal shot at UNESCO protection and a place in the sun.

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Casts of Thousands in Albania’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites

  • Lieke van Leeuwen and Cynthia Ord
  • 7 November 2011

Albania might not come to mind as a destination for amazing ruins and cultural heritage, especially in the shadow of an archaeological giant like Greece, its neighbour to the south. Yet ancient civilisations have left their fascinating marks throughout the Balkan peninsula, including Albania. In fact, all of Albania’s three UNESCO-listed World Heritage Sites exhibit grand-scale traits to rival any of their Balkan neighbours.

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Photo of the Week: Abu Simbel Temple, Luxor and Aswan, Egypt

  • Alfred Molon (Photo) Hossam Mostafa (Text)
  • 18 September 2011

The mighty temples in this Photo of the Week have made the name of Abu Simbel internationally famous since their rediscovery in the early 19th century. Originally constructed during the reign of Ramesses II in the mid 13th century BCE, the temples were lost in the shifting sands of the Nubian desert for many centuries.

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“For the Love of My Queen”: the Temples of Abu Simbel in Southern Egypt

  • Dr Benedict G. Davies
  • 5 January 2011

Through mighty works in stone – the supreme tools of royal propaganda – Ramesses II hoped to ensure that word of his supreme authority would extend throughout the Nubian lands, striking fear into the disparate, lawless tribes that inhabited these desert territories. In all, he would construct seven rock-cut temples in Nubia, the most impressive of which were the twin temples at Abu Simbel, one of which was devoted to his favourite queen, Nefertari.

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Uncover the Ancient History of Laos’ Plain of Jars

  • Laurel Angrist
  • 6 November 2010

Situated in the high plateaus of northeast Laos, the mountainous scenery of Xieng Khouang province beckons travellers to discover one of Southeast Asia’s most mysterious ancient cultural sites: the Plain of Jars. On guided tours in the mist-shrouded hills, uncover the enigmatic history of vanished civilisations and hear tales of secret wars waged.

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