Quantcast

Posts Tagged ‘biodiversity’

The Many Spheres of Heritage in the Cape Winelands of South Africa

  • Jenna Makowski with Moira Edmunds
  • 23 November 2011

East of Cape Town in South Africa, the Cape Winelands region encompasses a mountain chain, nearly 7,000 species of endemic plant life, hundreds of wine vineyards and over a quarter of a million people. No single feature of the Cape Winelands stands on its own. Rather, they form a complex web of connections: the gorgeous nature is related to the local agriculture, which is in turn connected to a history of colonisation and cultural development that continues to affect social and environmental issues today.

Read More >>

Maliau Basin: The Lost World of Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

  • Joebonaventure Matius
  • 17 November 2011

Maliau Basin is one of the world’s finest remaining wilderness areas. It encompasses over 390 square kilometres of pristine rainforest in the south-central part of Sabah, Borneo, in Malaysia. The rainforest is so dense that less than 50 percent of it has ever been explored. Today, the Maliau is awaiting UNESCO World Heritage Site status.

Read More >>

Malta’s Tentative UNESCO Sites: See Them Before It’s Official

  • whl.travel
  • 9 November 2011

While UNESCO approval of seven proposed World Heritage sites in Malta is still pending, their worth is certainly not negated by bureaucratic delays. In fact, their absence from the official list means that they have been kept just outside the UNESCO spotlight and perhaps a little farther off the tourist trail than the three recognised attractions. Here are the additional sites that Malta thinks deserve an equal shot at UNESCO protection and a place in the sun.

Read More >>

Travel in North Pantanal, Brazil’s Mighty Wetland, Is Now Possible Through whl.travel

  • whl.travel
  • 21 October 2011

THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH AND PORTUGUESE. North Pantanal, part of the world’s largest wetland, joins the ever-growing list of whl.travel destinations in Brazil. Now you can travel in North Pantanal through eco-friendly tours and activities, from fishing and habitat tours to overnight stays in a manner that sustainably blends tourist infrastructure with an emphasis on preserving nature’s delicate balance.

Read More >>

Forests: Visit Them, Conserve Them

  • Tensie Whelan
  • 5 September 2011

No fewer than 1.6 billion people — nearly a quarter of the world’s population — depend on forests for their livelihoods. Forests are also critical to maintaining biodiversity, mitigating climate change and enabling key ecosystem functions that regulate the biosphere. And yet about 45 per cent of the world’s forests have already been cleared. Here are some hard numbers to ponder that tell us how and why we should stop.

Read More >>

Video Spotlight: One Day on Earth

  • Paul Tavner
  • 28 August 2011

The One Day on Earth project began in 2008, with the vision of uniting the entire world in a single film-related project. The potential for collaboration offered by the internet is something that continues to be explored to this day, but the group behind One Day on Earth set out to achieve something that had never been seen before: a collection of moments, experiences and events from all corners of the globe with a single unifying experience – they all took place on the same day.

Read More >>

The Quiet Adventures of Banja Luka Come to whl.travel

  • whl.travel
  • 26 August 2011

THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH AND BOSNIAN. Tucked away in a quiet northwest corner of Bosnia-Herzegovina lies one of the last untouched natural ecosystems in Europe. You would be hard pressed to find more unspoiled countryside than that around Banja Luka, where lack of easy access and limited infrastructure once halted the usual tourist swell to this region.

Read More >>

Wandering Across the Wahiba Sands of Oman

  • Samantha Libby
  • 11 August 2011

The Wahiba Sands of Oman, also called the Sharqiyah Sands, are a geological and ecological wonder. This 12,500-square-kilometre carpet of rolling and shifting dunes is home to an astonishing 16,000 species of invertebrates, flora and fauna, and a rich mix of nomadic Bedouin people, all of which had adapted to living in the desert, a seemingly inhospitable place. Experience these wonders through desert camps, which offer travellers a daytime of adventure and a nighttime of comfort.

Read More >>

Shea Butter Helps Drive Community Development and Ecotourism in Ghana

  • Victoria Okoye
  • 8 August 2011

Mole National Park, Ghana’s largest protected ecosystem, is surrounded by nearly 30 indigenous rural communities that rely on the land for their livelihood. Addressing these fringe communities’ livelihood concerns is an important part of the work done in the area by one tour company, M&J Travel and Tours, committed to ecotourism in Ghana. It currently works with more than 350 women to support the local shea-butter production efforts for commercial trade.

Read More >>

Barra de Potosí, Mexico: Development Endangers a Fragile Ecosystem and the Future of a Community

  • Ali Zerriffi
  • 22 June 2011

Barra de Potosí is a small coastal village at the mouth of a lagoon, part of a complex and interdependent system of lagoons, which runs along the coast of the Municipio de Petatlan in Mexico. The people of Barra de Potosí are now confronted by and opposing a development project that they believe will destroy the existing ecosystem. The fight is proving to be a difficult one, and the people can use all the help they can get.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger... Read More >>