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Posts Tagged ‘history’

Miraculous El Sauce, Nicaragua

  • Rachel Eagan
  • 2 May 2013

Years of war and corruption have left the breathtaking landscape of Nicaragua pitted with pockets of poverty. In the United States, 4Walls Project has for the past five years been helping to build safe, sustainable housing for underprivileged families in El Sauce, sleepy cowboy town. What started as a two-woman project has quickly blossomed into a yearly pilgrimage for volunteers from all across the United States.

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The Best Local Travel Pictures of 2012

  • Ethan Gelber
  • 4 January 2013

With another year of pictures under our belt, it’s time again to spotlight our Photo of the Year – an image that most captured the imagination of The Travel Word team and a group of external judges. Like our Photo of the Year 2010 and Photo of the Year 2011, we believe this year’s winning image truly captures the imagination, a glimpse of something uncommon in a very familiar place.

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Photo of the Week: Angel Place Birdcages, Sydney, Australia

  • Ryan Zaknich (photo and text)
  • 7 December 2012

This photo was taken in Angel Place in the downtown area of Sydney, Australia. It is part of an art exhibit installed by the local council to remind us of the abundant birdlife that was in the area prior to English settlement. The birdcages are empty to remind us of the birds that have long since flow away.

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Photo of the Week: Locals in Old Beijing, China

  • Anton Jurgens (photo and text)
  • 26 October 2012

While the allure of old Beijing is increasingly overshadowed by progress, there are pockets of life that turn the clock back to the days of rickety bicycles, quiet hutongs with centuries of history to tell, and old men huddled intently and laughing over a game of mahjong, all the while turning endless strands of prayer beads.

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Busha Village, a Bright Star on the Tourist Map of Ukraine

  • Natalia Lukianovich
  • 17 October 2012

For a long time I had dreamed of running away from Kiev, but, for many reasons, I was tied to my city life. Then, during one of my annual small trips around Ukraine, I accidentally found the village of Busha. It was then that I knew that I’d soon be living here – and the very next year I began my new life. I have finally found what I was looking for and am eager to share it with visitors, who can stay in my home.

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Photo of the Week: A Gondolier on the Job, Venice, Italy

  • Cecilia Cambero (photo and text)
  • 12 October 2012

This picture, showing a gondolier during a work break, was taken near St. Mark’s Square, one of the main tourist spots in Venice, Italy. Although the area is always bustling, with people rushing around the place, this picture reflects one of those quiet moments that you can only glimpse when wandering a few corners off the beaten path, in Venice and elsewhere in Italy.

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Making the Most of Costa Rica’s Nature and National Independence Day

  • The Travel Word
  • 12 September 2012

On September 15, 1821, Costa Rica became a free nation. Today, September 15 is the Costa Rican national Independence Day holiday commemorating its nearly bloodless transition to self-rule. That Costa Rica has succeeded in nonviolently preserving its sovereignty is quite remarkable. So are the stable economy, world-class educational system and heavy public emphasis placed on biodiversity conservation.

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Video Spotlight: Rock Art with Aboriginal Elder Willie Gordon

  • Jakub Riziky
  • 10 August 2012

Head out in the open to tropical North Queensland in Australia, where Willie Gordon, an Aboriginal elder of the Guugu Yimithirr people, offers fascinating insight into the ancient culture of his ancestors. See how indigenous tourism can help local communities to preserve their culture and get a glimpse of what you might experience if you set out discover Aboriginal Australia.

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Aboriginal Tourism in Australia: 2012

  • Karolyn Wrightson
  • 8 August 2012

Environmentalists say Australia’s Great Barrier Reef was saved from destruction because tourists saw its value and lobbied for protection. No such worldwide lobby exists for the worlds oldest surviving culture. Like the reef, though, one of the best opportunities for the survival of ancient Australian Aboriginal lore is for tourists to call for its preservation. For that to happen, Aboriginal groups must teach tourists about their culture, an act that not only helps the outside world learn, but helps them pass the traditions down to their own children.

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Video Spotlight: Cycling Japan’s Abandoned Rail

  • Paul Tavner
  • 22 July 2012

Cycling Japan’s Abandoned Rail is a short film in which an American couple explore the abandoned railway lines of Hokkaido, looking into what’s still out there following widespread rail closures of the 1980s. Travelling through rural Japan via bike, they uncover a lost history that tells a fascinating tale that few outside of Japan itself will ever know.

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