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Posts Tagged ‘Syria’

Video Spotlight: Where the Hell Is Matt 2012

  • Paul Tavner
  • 24 June 2012

We featured the Where the Hell is Matt? 2008 update – part of a continuing series of short films about a funny dance – as a Video Spotlight toward the end of 2012. It was, in fact, the original inspiration for our Video Spotlights as a continuing feature here at The Travel Word. That’s why we were delighted…

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In Motion: Local Transport from Around the World

  • WHL Group
  • 5 October 2011

We believe that the different forms of local transport are unique qualities of a place that, when experienced, are a vital part of a local travel experience. To know a place is to get around it the way local people do: cramming yourself into a chicken bus in South America, throwing caution to the wind in a tuk-tuk in Southeast Asia or boarding a ferry in Africa. We’re sure you will find these rides to be a brilliant bonding experience with locals.

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Photo of the Week: Spice Market in Damascus, Syria

  • Omar Aboushaar (Photo) Ednan Ghamyan (Text)
  • 4 September 2011

This picture captures just some of the rich mix of colourful spices that can be found in many a market in Damascus, Syria. The variety of flavours on offer is overwhelming – even if you’re not trying to cook with them. The clash of bright colours is an intense experience for the eye and the incredible scents produced by the heaps of powder intermingle to create a distinctive and intoxicating miasma.

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Local Travel in Syria by Donkey, Tirtera and Scania Bus

  • Ednan Ghamyan
  • 23 August 2011

Transport in Syria is always an adventure requiring improvisation and spontaneity. High gas prices are the main reason why local transport is what it is today in all its living and very vivid colour. If the movie Planes, Trains & Automobiles were set in Syria, it would have been a completely different (but equally comic) film! On this virtual tour of Syrian modes of transport, you get a taste of the wide variety of unusual options on offer in our country.

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The Origins of Turkish Baths in Syria

  • Samantha Libby
  • 4 May 2011

In some cultures, taking a bath has always been a community affair. Thousands of years ago the Greeks and Romans popularised the practice. Today, hammams (Turkish bathhouses) across the Middle East and Mediterranean give spa enthusiasts a way to relive this ancient experience and to reap the numerous health benefits.

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Photo of the Week: Al-Hamidiyah Souq – The Ancient Mall of Damascus, Syria

  • Syrian Ministry of Tourism (Photo)
    Ednan Ghamyan (Text)
  • 22 August 2010

Strolling through Damascus’ Al-hamidiyah Souq, one comes across many Levantine delights. The goods on sale include items of local copperware, wooden mosaic artwork and much, much more. Everyone should sample the delights of the Bekdash Ice Cream shop, which serves first-rate, locally made ice cream to help you gain weight! After a wonderful walk, you find yourself in the shadow of the the beautiful Umayyad Mosque.

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Rich Local Travel Insights from Damascus, Syria

  • WHL Group
  • 21 July 2010

Every month, we delve into the travel experiences of people in the extended WHL Group network. This month we talk to Ednan Ghamyan, who works for Ghazal Tours, the whl.travel local connection based in Damascus, Syria.

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Syria: A Timeless and Splendid Nation

  • Ednan Ghamyan
  • 18 March 2010

The Levant is a timeless place that is sure to enchant and Syria is its beating heart. From the balmy, heart-warming Mediterranean Sea to the remarkable Roman remains, Syria is a country affectionate to her visitors, like a mother to her infant. If you are looking for the missing pages of history and if you have a penchant for scenery and romance, Syria really is the place for you.

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Local Syrian Experiences Now Online

  • whl.travel
  • 11 February 2009

THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH AND ARABIC. whl.travel is pleased to announce the launch of Damascus, Syria, an ancient metropolis that has for too long been overlooked by travellers from all corners of the globe. Widely considered to be one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world, Damascus has seen its streets painted with influence from the Egyptians, Babylonians, Romans and many more cultures dating back to 8,000 years.

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