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Posts Tagged ‘time lapse’

Video Spotlight: Across the Andes

  • Jakub Riziky
  • 21 September 2012

Take a quick trip through the Andes and over the Altiplano with this week’s video spotlight. Well-paced time-lapse footage follows winding mountain paths across Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, offering breathtaking views of ragged mountain tops, ancient monuments and local city life along the way.

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Video Spotlight: MOVE

  • Paul Tavner
  • 29 April 2012

A short but sweet addition to the Video Spotlight archive this week: an imaginative clip that puts a new spin on the time-lapse format that we know and love. Part of a series of three minute-long films commissioned by STA Australia, MOVE condenses several months of travel into a 60 second highlight reel but connects the footage together in an impressive and innovative way.

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Video Spotlight: The Longest Way

  • Paul Tavner
  • 15 April 2012

Often, personal grooming is one the first victims of a long spell of travelling. It’s fair to say that a lot of us tend to take a more ‘pragmatic’ approach when we’re out on the road. After all, that’s what makes proper showers such a prized commodity. This means that sometimes we can all end up looking a bit scruffy. That’s fine, since everyone’s in the same boat and no one’s going to judge you when you flop into your hostel bed at the end of a long day of trekking.

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Learning Slow Travel Through the Eye of Time Lapse

  • WHL Group
  • 13 February 2012

There are lessons to be learned from time-lapse photography about the beauty of slow travel. Park yourself somewhere and stay awhile. Be still. Go for long exposure. Reconsider time, stretch it, condense it and watch its flow. Leave a place with a long time-lapse memory of it rather than a handful of sporadic snapshot seconds. Here, we’ve asked our local partners from all over the world for time-lapse footage that moves them.

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Video Spotlight: Speeding Around The World in Under 5 Minutes

  • Paul Tavner
  • 8 January 2012

While the film contains its fair share of recognisable landmarks, what we enjoy about it is how the process Lam has used works just as well with unspectacular locations. A crooked bridge over a fast-flowing stream looks just as fantastic as the Eiffel Tower when it’s portrayed in this way.

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