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Posts Tagged ‘weather’

The Top Five Things to Do in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

  • Africa.com
  • 19 March 2012

The economic centre, largest city and former capital of Tanzania, Dar Es Salaam, is rich in culture, heritage, history and sightseeing. It is a starting point for many visitors making their way to other large attractions in Tanzania, such as the coastal islands or inland safaris, but there is also a lot to see and do in this town.

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Cycling in Iceland: Rain, Bright Nights, Stunning Views and Unbeatable Adventures

  • Thomas Marvin
  • 12 August 2011

Back in 2006, my friend Legs and I packed our bags and bikes and headed to Iceland for a six-week pootle round the island. The cycling trip ended up being some of the most amazing six weeks of my life – howling gales that lasted days, thoroughly pot-holed dirt tracks, stunning views and the invention of tuna tikka-massala.

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Wandering Across the Wahiba Sands of Oman

  • Samantha Libby
  • 11 August 2011

The Wahiba Sands of Oman, also called the Sharqiyah Sands, are a geological and ecological wonder. This 12,500-square-kilometre carpet of rolling and shifting dunes is home to an astonishing 16,000 species of invertebrates, flora and fauna, and a rich mix of nomadic Bedouin people, all of which had adapted to living in the desert, a seemingly inhospitable place. Experience these wonders through desert camps, which offer travellers a daytime of adventure and a nighttime of comfort.

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Monsoons in Goa, India: Paradise in the Rain

  • Ashok Doshi
  • 17 May 2011

It is just about dawn. Half past 5, or maybe 6am. I can hear the cuckoo singing, as it has been doing for the past week or so. It’s a sure sign that the monsoon rains are on their way to Goa, India. We already know this from the forecast, which shows them about a month away, edging toward Kerala, where they make landfall in late May or early June, about one week before they reach Goa.

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Queensland, Australia, Faces Devastating Floods

  • Shaun Gilchrist
  • 15 January 2011

In 1974, the flooding Brisbane River of Queensland, Australia, peaked at 5.4 metres. It has been etched in local memory as the worst inundation the city and surrounding areas faced in the 20th century. Although the Brisbane River peaked just below the 1974 level on 13 January 2011, the damage has been far more targic and it is now the new point of reference for flood devastation.

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Photo of the Week: Sustainable Hydration in Bodrum, Turkey

  • Gerard Oude Hergelink (Photo and Text)
  • 5 September 2010

One of the wonders of a sub-tropical climate, such as that found in Bodrum, Turkey, is its almost invisible hydration system on the ground. Generally no drop of rain falls from May until November, but flowers and plants in nature nevertheless thrive well.

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Natural Disasters Pound Southeast Asia, Including Typhoon Ketsana

  • Diane Wuthrich and Ethan Gelber
  • 2 October 2009

It came as a triple whammy for which no one was prepared: Tuesday’s major undersea earthquake in the South Pacific triggered a devastating tsunami in Samoa and American Samoa; two pummelling tectonic shakedowns on the Indonesian island of Sumatra have produced heaps of rubble; all while the world deplored the wind- and water-lashed aftermath of last weekend’s Typhoon Ketsana, which slammed into the Philippines.

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